Make Some Space: Tuning into Total Refreshment Centre by Emma Warren

Make Some Space: Tuning into Total Refreshment Centre by Emma Warren

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Description

Make Some Space: Tuning into Total Refreshment Centre by Emma Warren

Make Some Space​ documents the colourful community that ran ad hoc music venue Total Refreshment Centre. It tells the story of an Edwardian factory that became an influential music space that was run on the shortest of shoestrings. It’s an insider guide that explains how TRC helped incubate the new London jazz scene, and which uses deep research to link Britain’s turn-of-the-century sugar rush to lovers rock and forgotten London venues. It’s a vivacious and idiosyncratic reminder of why we need places to gather.
It combines narrative chapters with quotes from new London jazz musicians Nubya Garcia, Shabaka Hutchings, Joe Armon-Jones, Theon Cross, Kwake Bass, Henry Wu aka Kamaal Williams and The Comet Is Coming plus Gilles Peterson, Kieran Hebden, Glamma Kid, The Mighty Diamonds, Louie Vega, Snapped Ankles and Bo Ningen.

Make Some Space ​uncovers the original inhabitants of the TRC building, which operated as a confectionary factory until the mid 1940s. It takes the reader back in time to Mellow Mix, who took over when the collapse of a gearbox factory left the building derelict and ran rehearsal rooms throughout the 1990s and 2000s for local and international reggae royalty, as well as pirate radio and grassroots theatre.
The book contains cameos including Bob Marley dipping into a Hackney after-hours spot; the Thompson Twins’ delay pedal; grime godfather Wiley; Johnny Rotten’s politics teacher and the 1912 Hackney Mayor.

Reviews


“A lyrical testimony to the power of street-level social energy and creativity – and a considered and optimistic rebuke to the forces that continually seek to oppress it” - Richard King