Lorelines by David Chatton Barker

Lorelines by David Chatton Barker

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Lorelines by David Chatton Barker £19.99
£19.99

Description

Lorelines by David Chatton Barker

Exploring the anthropology, archaeology, legends and lore of the moors surrounding Brown Wardle Hill in the Vale of Whitworth Lancashire, this publication brings together the artist's images, text, interpretation and intervention, occupying someplace between history and art, folklore, performance and documentation. The book is in full colour over 170 pages with fold out A3 map.

Artist's words about the project and book -

"The genius loci is ‘the spirit of the place’, often particular spots of beauty or significance would possess such a name, or resonate with a certain feeling. This is often due to the history of activity on or around a site. For me these moors ring out like bells of resonant presence. I enjoy thinking about them in relation to mycelium, the patterned network underneath the ground in which grows fungi or mushrooms. I see all the events, people and places in this book joined together underground by an invisible network of threads/lines, a new sort of map that uses remnants of our culture to trace a thread from 8,000 years ago right up to the present, beginning with prehistoric stone and bone and ending with plastic litter.

In Aboriginal culture there is a thing known as song lines, these are markers in the landscape such as stones, trees, mounds, wells and stories which have meaning to the people in the area. Each spot has a melody or song and this is sung as people walk past the places, bringing them to life, back into memory. It is a way of binding together a place. This project is called Lorelines for a similar reason. I have woven together a collection of stories, sounds, photography and artefacts to share with locals, and those further a afield, in the hope of enhancing their experience of the landscape in and around the valley. It is hoped that this book will inspire people to trace the richly patterned network of history that resonates across the windswept moors of Whitworth.”